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Presti35 Virgo

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Joined: 05 Oct 2001
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2020 11:45 am
Post subject: Great Australian MoviesReply with quote

What are some of the hidden gems out there?

I'll start off with this;

The Big Steal

Filmed in Melbourne in 1989 and released in 1990, starring Ben Mendelsohn and Claudia Karvan with Steve Bisley as the dodgy car dealer Gordon Farkas.

Whoops wrong end!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZF4zsEsAVl4

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think positive Libra

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2020 1:57 pm
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does Mad max count??
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stui magpie Gemini

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2020 2:12 pm
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I would prefer to kick Mick Molloy dead set in the nads rather than spend any time in his company, but Crackerjack was an under rated movie.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GtP8MIDDBps

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roar 



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PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2020 2:16 pm
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think positive wrote:
does Mad max count??


Of course! But only 1 & 2

I have a long list but will start with this gem:

Death In Brunswick

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bucksisgod Scorpio



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PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2020 2:36 pm
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Romper Stomper ( Russell Crowe ) and Two Hands ( Heath Ledger )
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Wokko Pisces

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2020 2:42 pm
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The Proposition
Breaker Morant

Would be two of my favourites.

Bad Boy Bubby for the biggest WTF you'll ever experience.
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Morrigu Capricorn



Joined: 11 Aug 2001


PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2020 2:55 pm
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Not a big movie watcher really but I did love:
The Castle
Rabbit-Proof Fence
Red dog
Oddball
The Sapphires
Crackerjack

And Strictly Ballroom Embarassed Always dig it out when the better half goes on the boys camping weekends - guess I won't be watching it for bit Sad
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David Libra

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2020 2:57 pm
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Here are a few that come to mind:

Picnic at Hanging Rock (Peter Weir, 1975): I presume most people here have seen this, or at least are familiar with it. Brilliant adaptation of Joan Lindsay's mystery novel that is magnificently eerie, thanks in part to a great soundtrack and stunning cinematography. In some ways, this has never quite felt fully like an Australian film to me, even though it very much is one – perhaps all the British accents in the film have something to do with that.

The Devil's Playground (Fred Schepisi, 1976): Set in a Catholic boys' seminary, this film feels very relevant to the Pell case and everything surrounding it, even though sexual abuse is only ever hinted at. What the film is about more explicitly is the sexual repression, authoritarianism and crises of faith that anyone who has grown up in a religious environment will likely be familiar with.

Walkabout (Nicolas Roeg, 1971): Your mileage might vary on whether this actually qualifies as "Australian" – made by a British filmmaker in Australia, it very much feels like an outsider's view of the country (not least in terms of the geography; we're supposed to believe that the upper South Australian outback is an easy drive away from Sydney!) It's basically about an English teenage girl and her younger brother becoming stranded in the desert after their father kills himself, and meeting a teenage Aboriginal boy out alone on his initiation. Meanwhile, some scientists are testing some weather balloons or something (these narratives never really intersect). Nothing much else happens, but the film has a surreal, dreamlike vibe and, of course, a lengthy nude swimming sequence that seems to be the only thing most people remember about the film.

Don's Party (Bruce Beresford, 1976): Adaptation of a David Williamson play about an election-night party in 1969 in which a bunch of snooty Labor supporters hang out, get drunk and act like morons as their hopes of victory fade. A pretty biting, feel-bad satire on the sensibilities and culture of pre-Whitlam Australia. It was also on my mind a lot when Shorten lost to Morrison last year.

Marinetti (Albie Thoms, 1969): Okay, who here is into experimental film? Anyone? Laughing If not, don't even bother, but if names like Kenneth Anger, Stan Brakhage and Michael Snow pique your interest, you might like to give this a look. It's the only feature film made by the Sydney underground Ubu co-op, a group of visual artists who mostly made weird short comedies and scratches on celluloid, etc. Anyway, this is mostly just footage of '60s Sydney house parties and the like with colour filters and a jazz soundtrack, structured as a homage to the titular futurist poet (also a key early figure in the Italian fascist movement, lol).

Ten Canoes (Rolf de Heer & Peter Djigirr, 2006): Pretty much the only film I'm aware of that is set solely in pre-colonisation Australia (though I'm sure there must be others!). If nothing else, it's a fascinating anthropological insight into Indigenous customs, work and cultural dynamics before invasion (the film was made with the full consultation of the local Ramingining community in Arnhem Land), and done fully in Yolngu language with subtitles, but it's also a pretty entertaining film, dealing with the story of a single young man who lusts after one of his older brother's three wives.

Mary and Max (Adam Elliot, 2009): Cute stop-motion animation about the penpal friendship between a girl and a guy with Asperger's, by the director of Harvie Krumpet. Kind of weird and offbeat, as you might expect. I quite liked it at the time.

Samson and Delilah (Warwick Thornton, 2009): Near-wordless film about a teenage Aboriginal boy and girl growing up in an impoverished remote community who run off together. It's an in many ways grim depiction of substance abuse, racism and poverty, but it's also really beautifully paced and shot, and probably the last truly great film made in the country.

Strange Colours (Alena Lodkina, 2017): A kind of slow, arty film about a young woman from the city who comes to stay with her ill father in the remote, tiny mining town of Lightning Ridge in rural New South Wales, populated almost entirely by middle-aged male alcoholics who don't talk much. It might not sound like much, but I found it a beautiful, sensitive depiction of a part (and population) of Australia that tends to be overlooked in our cinema.

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thesoretoothsayer 



Joined: 26 Apr 2017


PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2020 3:26 pm
Post subject: Re: Great Australian MoviesReply with quote

Presti35 wrote:
What are some of the hidden gems out there?

I'll start off with this;

The Big Steal
...

I think the same team did Malcolm which must be the most Melbourne movie ever (lots of trams). Another underrated gem.
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0091464/?ref_=tt_sims_tt

Also, Dogs in Space really picked up the alternative Melbourne vibe of the late 70s, early 80s. Not the greatest movie but does have a Boys Next Door cameo.
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0092904/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1
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think positive Libra

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2020 3:49 pm
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bucksisgod wrote:
Romper Stomper ( Russell Crowe ) and Two Hands ( Heath Ledger )

romper stomper was brilliant

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think positive Libra

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2020 3:51 pm
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Wokko wrote:
The Proposition
Breaker Morant

Would be two of my favourites.

Bad Boy Bubby for the biggest WTF you'll ever experience.


true

i did like breaker morant,

and also The Thorn birds!

great thread, i thought i hated all aussie tv/movies!

the sapphires isnt bad, just hubby made me watch it too many times!

and the only thing with Nicole kidman in i can stand, bankok hilton.

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think positive Libra

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2020 3:52 pm
Post subject: Re: Great Australian MoviesReply with quote

thesoretoothsayer wrote:
Presti35 wrote:
What are some of the hidden gems out there?

I'll start off with this;

The Big Steal
...

I think the same team did Malcolm which must be the most Melbourne movie ever (lots of trams). Another underrated gem.
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0091464/?ref_=tt_sims_tt

Also, Dogs in Space really picked up the alternative Melbourne vibe of the late 70s, early 80s. Not the greatest movie but does have a Boys Next Door cameo.
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0092904/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1



ah yes, Malcom, Tim with mel Gibson want bad either!

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think positive Libra

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2020 3:54 pm
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Morrigu wrote:
Not a big movie watcher really but I did love:
The Castle
Rabbit-Proof Fence
Red dog
Oddball
The Sapphires
Crackerjack

And Strictly Ballroom Embarassed Always dig it out when the better half goes on the boys camping weekends - guess I won't be watching it for bit Sad


castle isnt bad, love oddball, and red dog but that one needs a lifetime supply of kleenex!

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think positive Libra

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2020 3:55 pm
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David wrote:
Here are a few that come to mind:

Picnic at Hanging Rock (Peter Weir, 1975): I presume most people here have seen this, or at least are familiar with it. Brilliant adaptation of Joan Lindsay's mystery novel that is magnificently eerie, thanks in part to a great soundtrack and stunning cinematography. In some ways, this has never quite felt fully like an Australian film to me, even though it very much is one – perhaps all the British accents in the film have something to do with that.

The Devil's Playground (Fred Schepisi, 1976): Set in a Catholic boys' seminary, this film feels very relevant to the Pell case and everything surrounding it, even though sexual abuse is only ever hinted at. What the film is about more explicitly is the sexual repression, authoritarianism and crises of faith that anyone who has grown up in a religious environment will likely be familiar with.

Walkabout (Nicolas Roeg, 1971): Your mileage might vary on whether this actually qualifies as "Australian" – made by a British filmmaker in Australia, it very much feels like an outsider's view of the country (not least in terms of the geography; we're supposed to believe that the upper South Australian outback is an easy drive away from Sydney!) It's basically about an English teenage girl and her younger brother becoming stranded in the desert after their father kills himself, and meeting a teenage Aboriginal boy out alone on his initiation. Meanwhile, some scientists are testing some weather balloons or something (these narratives never really intersect). Nothing much else happens, but the film has a surreal, dreamlike vibe and, of course, a lengthy nude swimming sequence that seems to be the only thing most people remember about the film.

Don's Party (Bruce Beresford, 1976): Adaptation of a David Williamson play about an election-night party in 1969 in which a bunch of snooty Labor supporters hang out, get drunk and act like morons as their hopes of victory fade. A pretty biting, feel-bad satire on the sensibilities and culture of pre-Whitlam Australia. It was also on my mind a lot when Shorten lost to Morrison last year.

Marinetti (Albie Thoms, 1969): Okay, who here is into experimental film? Anyone? Laughing If not, don't even bother, but if names like Kenneth Anger, Stan Brakhage and Michael Snow pique your interest, you might like to give this a look. It's the only feature film made by the Sydney underground Ubu co-op, a group of visual artists who mostly made weird short comedies and scratches on celluloid, etc. Anyway, this is mostly just footage of '60s Sydney house parties and the like with colour filters and a jazz soundtrack, structured as a homage to the titular futurist poet (also a key early figure in the Italian fascist movement, lol).

Ten Canoes (Rolf de Heer & Peter Djigirr, 2006): Pretty much the only film I'm aware of that is set solely in pre-colonisation Australia (though I'm sure there must be others!). If nothing else, it's a fascinating anthropological insight into Indigenous customs, work and cultural dynamics before invasion (the film was made with the full consultation of the local Ramingining community in Arnhem Land), and done fully in Yolngu language with subtitles, but it's also a pretty entertaining film, dealing with the story of a single young man who lusts after one of his older brother's three wives.

Mary and Max (Adam Elliot, 2009): Cute stop-motion animation about the penpal friendship between a girl and a guy with Asperger's, by the director of Harvie Krumpet. Kind of weird and offbeat, as you might expect. I quite liked it at the time.

Samson and Delilah (Warwick Thornton, 2009): Near-wordless film about a teenage Aboriginal boy and girl growing up in an impoverished remote community who run off together. It's an in many ways grim depiction of substance abuse, racism and poverty, but it's also really beautifully paced and shot, and probably the last truly great film made in the country.

Strange Colours (Alena Lodkina, 2017): A kind of slow, arty film about a young woman from the city who comes to stay with her ill father in the remote, tiny mining town of Lightning Ridge in rural New South Wales, populated almost entirely by middle-aged male alcoholics who don't talk much. It might not sound like much, but I found it a beautiful, sensitive depiction of a part (and population) of Australia that tends to be overlooked in our cinema.


walkabouts not bad

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partypie 



Joined: 01 Oct 2010


PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2020 4:27 pm
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All of the above plus

Mr Reliable with Colin Friels and Jacqueline McKenzie

Australia with Nicole Kidman and many others including David Numbajarra ( a friend who sadly died a few years ago)

Spotswood - Anthony Hopkins (before he was a big star he agrees to do a small film in Melbourne), Ben Mendelson

Death In Brunswick - Sam Neill
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