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More states legalize Pot 8) when for Oz?

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When will it be legal here?
Within 2 years
20%
 20%  [ 3 ]
2-5 years
13%
 13%  [ 2 ]
6-10 years
6%
 6%  [ 1 ]
11-20 years
26%
 26%  [ 4 ]
It'll never happen
33%
 33%  [ 5 ]
Total Votes : 15

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K 



Joined: 09 Sep 2011


PostPosted: Thu Dec 27, 2018 2:19 pm
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Is CBD Helpful, or Just Hype?

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/26/opinion/cbd-cannabis-health-anxiety.html

"Suddenly, CBD is everywhere. CBD, short for cannabidiol, a non-psychotropic component of cannabis and hemp, is being promoted as the latest miracle cure. Enthusiasts rave about its supposed anti-anxiety, anti-inflammatory, antidepressant and, well, anti-everything-you-don’t-like effects.
...

From pills to edibles, CBD is wildly popular, and it is easily available online and in stores. Indeed, sales are predicted to reach $22 billion by 2022, according to the Brightfield Group, a cannabis market research firm.
...

Cannabidiol has little direct effect on the cannabinoid receptors in the brain, so it is largely devoid of the euphoric effects of THC, the major intoxicant in marijuana. But if CBD really had no psychotropic effect at all, it would be hard to understand its popularity. In fact, because it alters the brain’s serotonin receptors and may interfere with the breakdown of anandamide — a cannabidoid that is produced naturally in the brain — it could well affect feeling and thinking.
...

To be fair, the paucity of data about CBD’s efficacy and safety in part reflects the federal government’s irrational restrictions on cannabis research.
...

The public, rightly, is quick to demand proof of safety and efficacy when it comes to synthetic pharmaceuticals. Why should natural products, like CBD, get a pass?

Perhaps it’s because many people have romantic and misplaced notions about nature. Some even point out that we come hard-wired with cannabinoid receptors in our brains and they must have a purpose, so why not use them? This is not exactly a persuasive argument: Nature endowed us with our own cannabinoids, so unless you have a deficiency of them or sluggish receptors, you really don’t need supplementation.

...

Future studies may show otherwise, but at present CBD looks more like an expensive placebo than a panacea."

'Richard A. Friedman is a professor of clinical psychiatry and the director of the psychopharmacology clinic at the Weill Cornell Medical College, and a contributing opinion writer.'

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Skids Cancer



Joined: 11 Sep 2007
Location: Joined 3/6/02 ... aka Assassin member #175

PostPosted: Thu Dec 27, 2018 10:41 pm
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There will always be fakes.
This is a result, of a lack of positive moves.... stall and you let these phonies (legally) exploit loop holes. What a joke!

Just make it legal!

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K 



Joined: 09 Sep 2011


PostPosted: Thu Dec 27, 2018 10:57 pm
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K wrote:
...
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/26/opinion/cbd-cannabis-health-anxiety.html

"...
... Some even point out that we come hard-wired with cannabinoid receptors in our brains and they must have a purpose, so why not use them? This is not exactly a persuasive argument: Nature endowed us with our own cannabinoids, so unless you have a deficiency of them or sluggish receptors, you really don’t need supplementation.
..."

'Richard A. Friedman is a professor of clinical psychiatry and the director of the psychopharmacology clinic at the Weill Cornell Medical College, and a contributing opinion writer.'

There are, of course, lots of reader comments* on that article, many attesting to how much CBD has (allegedly) helped readers. Friedman's article would be more palatable if he held the same concerns for pharmaceutical products. Somehow he and his ilk seem worried about the placebo effect only when it's not the pharma stuff that's involved. (In practice, for example, people terminally ill looking for pain relief won't care about how much is the placebo effect and how much something else.)

The highlighted bit above is precisely the type of "not exactly persuasive" argument that Friedman's profession peddles to justify the use of Big Pharma products such as antidepressants. (For "cannabinoids", substitute "serotonin", and their argument and the reason it's not a good one are essentially the same.)


In a part of Friedman's article that I did not quote before, he talks about how, a few years ago, he tried "two marijuana specials — Nine-Pound Hammer and Trainwreck — and some CBD gummy bears", and the latter "as far as I could tell, was a fruit-flavored placebo". I don't know if he thinks this will establish his street cred, or whether he's trying to follow the journalistic formula for newspaper article writing, but it seems to have done the opposite -- shown that he does not know much about marijuana. I'd also like to know what he thought the gummy bears would do for him, if he does not have any of the ailments people are using CBD for.



* By the time comments were closed, there were over 900. I'll see if there's anything interesting among them.
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K 



Joined: 09 Sep 2011


PostPosted: Sun Dec 30, 2018 3:10 pm
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On opioid addiction:

In Rehab, ‘Two Warring Factions’: Abstinence vs. Medication

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/29/health/opioid-rehab-abstinence-medication.html

[Check out the horse pic.]

"... [T]he company is ramping up its use of medications to blunt the torturous withdrawal symptoms and cravings that compel many with opioid addiction to keep using. There is substantial evidence backing this approach, which is supposed to be used in tandem with therapy. But because two of the three federally approved medicines are opioids themselves, it is spurned by people who believe taking drugs to quit drugs is not real recovery.
...

More than 70,000 people in the United States died of overdoses in 2017, and opioids were the main driver. But nationally, 49 percent of the nearly 3,000 residential programs that treat opioid addiction still don’t use any of the medications proven to save lives, according to an analysis by amfAR...
...

Anti-craving medications are not a silver bullet; relapse is common even among people who take them, and some in fact do better with an abstinence approach. But there is substantial evidence that buprenorphine and a similar drug, methadone — which has faced ideological resistance on and off for decades — reduce the mortality rate among people addicted to opioids by half or more; they are also more successful at keeping people in treatment than abstinence-based approaches. A federally funded study last year found that naltrexone, a non-opioid medication that JourneyPure has offered to some patients since it opened in 2015, was just as effective as buprenorphine.

But naltrexone, also known by the brand name Vivitrol, is more expensive and people tend not to stay on it as long. It is also harder to start because it requires a long detox period first.
...

It’s true that if medications became the main form of addiction treatment, the pharmaceutical industry would benefit — an outrageous outcome, critics of the approach believe, given the industry’s role in creating the opioid epidemic. But medication-focused treatment would also threaten residential programs like JourneyPure, a for-profit company with locations in Florida and Kentucky as well as Tennessee. It charges an average of $15,000, and up to $26,000, for a monthlong stay, though many of its patients have private insurance that covers most of the cost."
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K 



Joined: 09 Sep 2011


PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2019 11:18 pm
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What Advocates of Legalizing Pot Don’t Want You to Know

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/04/opinion/marijuana-pot-health-risks-legalization.html

"Instead, the change has been largely driven by decadeslong lobbying by marijuana legalization advocates and for-profit cannabis companies.

Those groups have shrewdly recast marijuana as a medicine rather than an intoxicant. Some have even claimed that marijuana can help slow the opioid epidemic, though studies show that people who use cannabis are more likely to start using opioids later.

Meanwhile, legalization advocates have squelched discussion of the serious mental health risks of marijuana and THC, the chemical responsible for the drug’s psychoactive effects.
...

With large studies in peer-reviewed journals showing that marijuana increases the risk of psychosis and schizophrenia, the scientific literature around the drug is far more negative than it was 20 years ago. Comparing two major reports from the National Academy of Medicine, the nonprofit group that advises the federal government on health and medicine, makes the difference clear.

In a report in 1999, the academy (then called the Institute of Medicine) reported that “the association between marijuana and schizophrenia is not well understood.” It even suggested the drug might help some people with schizophrenia. But in its next major report on marijuana, released in 2017, the academy reached a very different conclusion: “Cannabis use is likely to increase the risk of schizophrenia and other psychoses; the higher the use, the greater the risk.”
...

Many older Americans remember marijuana as a relatively weak drug that they used casually in social settings like concerts. They’re not wrong. In the 1970s and 1980s, marijuana generally contained less than 5 percent THC. Today, the marijuana sold at legal dispensaries often contains 25 percent THC.
...

Scientists must do much more research to understand how cannabis can cause psychosis, and the strength of the link. But hospitals are already seeing the effect of these new use patterns. According to the federal Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, in 2006, emergency rooms saw 30,000 cases of people who had diagnoses of psychosis and marijuana-use disorder — the medical term for abuse or dependence on the drug. By 2014, that number had tripled to 90,000.
...

Worse — because marijuana can cause paranoia and psychosis, and those conditions are closely linked to violence — it appears to lead to an increase in violent crime. Before recreational legalization began in 2014, advocates promised that it would reduce violent crime. But the first four states to legalize — Alaska, Colorado, Oregon and Washington — have seen sharp increases in murders and aggravated assaults since 2014, according to reports from the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Police reports and news articles show a clear link to cannabis in many cases.
...

Marijuana’s risks are different from opioids’, but they are no less real."

Alex Berenson ... is the author of the forthcoming “Tell Your Children: The Truth About Marijuana, Mental Illness, and Violence.”
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HAL 

Please don't shout at me - I can't help it.


Joined: 17 Mar 2003


PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2019 11:21 pm
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What happened after recreational legalization began in 2014 advocates promised that it would reduce violent crime ?
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Skids Cancer



Joined: 11 Sep 2007
Location: Joined 3/6/02 ... aka Assassin member #175

PostPosted: Sun Jan 06, 2019 10:28 am
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K wrote:
What Advocates of Legalizing Pot Don’t Want You to Know

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/04/opinion/marijuana-pot-health-risks-legalization.html

"Instead, the change has been largely driven by decadeslong lobbying by marijuana legalization advocates and for-profit cannabis companies.

Those groups have shrewdly recast marijuana as a medicine rather than an intoxicant. Some have even claimed that marijuana can help slow the opioid epidemic, though studies show that people who use cannabis are more likely to start using opioids later.

Meanwhile, legalization advocates have squelched discussion of the serious mental health risks of marijuana and THC, the chemical responsible for the drug’s psychoactive effects.
...

With large studies in peer-reviewed journals showing that marijuana increases the risk of psychosis and schizophrenia, the scientific literature around the drug is far more negative than it was 20 years ago. Comparing two major reports from the National Academy of Medicine, the nonprofit group that advises the federal government on health and medicine, makes the difference clear.

In a report in 1999, the academy (then called the Institute of Medicine) reported that “the association between marijuana and schizophrenia is not well understood.” It even suggested the drug might help some people with schizophrenia. But in its next major report on marijuana, released in 2017, the academy reached a very different conclusion: “Cannabis use is likely to increase the risk of schizophrenia and other psychoses; the higher the use, the greater the risk.”
...

Many older Americans remember marijuana as a relatively weak drug that they used casually in social settings like concerts. They’re not wrong. In the 1970s and 1980s, marijuana generally contained less than 5 percent THC. Today, the marijuana sold at legal dispensaries often contains 25 percent THC.
...

Scientists must do much more research to understand how cannabis can cause psychosis, and the strength of the link. But hospitals are already seeing the effect of these new use patterns. According to the federal Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, in 2006, emergency rooms saw 30,000 cases of people who had diagnoses of psychosis and marijuana-use disorder — the medical term for abuse or dependence on the drug. By 2014, that number had tripled to 90,000.
...

Worse — because marijuana can cause paranoia and psychosis, and those conditions are closely linked to violence — it appears to lead to an increase in violent crime. Before recreational legalization began in 2014, advocates promised that it would reduce violent crime. But the first four states to legalize — Alaska, Colorado, Oregon and Washington — have seen sharp increases in murders and aggravated assaults since 2014, according to reports from the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Police reports and news articles show a clear link to cannabis in many cases.
...

Marijuana’s risks are different from opioids’, but they are no less real."

Alex Berenson ... is the author of the forthcoming “Tell Your Children: The Truth About Marijuana, Mental Illness, and Violence.”


This book has as many facts as his 12 fictitious spy novels.

A history and economics graduate.... he should stick to what he knows, bullshit & history.

_________________
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K 



Joined: 09 Sep 2011


PostPosted: Sun Jan 06, 2019 3:33 pm
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Skids wrote:
...
This book has as many facts as his 12 fictitious spy novels.

A history and economics graduate.... he should stick to what he knows, bullshit & history.

Has he really written 12 spy novels??

I wonder if there's a cool way you can use a bong to kill someone in a spy novel.
I guess the spy could club his adversary to death with the bong, but I don't think that's very cool.
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stui magpie 

Oh the Premiership's a cakewalk


Joined: 03 May 2005
Location: preparing the Pilosocereus suppository

PostPosted: Tue Jan 08, 2019 6:58 pm
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And now we suddenly have an epidemic of an artificial amphetamine turning people into off their nut zombies who leap off buildings thinking they can fly, lick dances floors until their tongues bleed and try to run through walls.

Or do we?

Quote:
It’s the drug allegedly turning users into “superhuman zombies” and spreading rapidly across Australia’s party scene, but experts say panic about “monkey dust” is greatly exaggerated.

Monkey dust is the latest in a string of synthetic drugs making the rounds at music festivals and in nightclubs and raves around the world.

While the drug can be dangerous, even fatal when ingested in large doses, it isn’t a new substance, and experts say there is no evidence to suggest it has overtaken Australia’s party scene.

A report by the Herald Sunraised the issue of the rise of monkey dust use across Australia, but experts have responded claiming there is no need for national panic, or a “major health alert” from authorities.

So what exactly is monkey dust, and why is everyone going bananas about it?

NOT-SO-NEW DESIGNER DRUG

Monkey dust is not some scary, new designer drug, rather it’s a street name for an existing synthetic drug known as MDPV (or Methylenedioxypyrovalerone).

It also goes by the more popular name “bath salts”, but Edith Cowan University senior lecturer in addiction Stephen Bright says trying to wind down in a tub full of this stuff will make your bathroom “smell like a meth lab”.

MDPV is a psychoactive substance that can be “snorted, smoked, taken orally or injected” and its effects can kick in at low doses of 5-10mg.

“It has quite a euphoric effect but is also very stimulating when taken at a very low dose,” Dr Bright said.

Back in 2011, the same drug was pedalled in adult stores across Australia’s major cities as legal, synthetic cocaine.

Now, MDPV is sold cheaply under the nickname monkey dust, and is most commonly used as a filler in ecstasy pills.

It is easily imported from China, where it is legal to produce MDPV.

Monkey dust is also known more commonly as ‘bath salts’, both of which contain the drug MDPV.

WHAT DOES IT DO TO YOU?

As a stimulant, the effects of monkey dust are similar to those of cocaine or amphetamines. It peps up your energy levels, boosts your confidence and dramatically increases risk-taking behaviour.

While there are stories of users “jumping off buildings” or “running in front of cars”, Dr Bright said he hadn’t heard of any such cases in Australia.

He said monkey dust use would more likely cause serious internal damage.

“At overdose levels, this drug can cause cardiac failure and the overheating of your internal organs,” he said.

This terrifying process, known as rhabdomyolysis, means that your internal organs effectively melt from overheating.

Dr Bright said most reports suggest those who take monkey dust intentionally say it’s “quite pleasurable”.

“Many say it’s quite a more-ish drug,” he said.

“But there needs to be a distinction between intentional use of monkey dust and unintentional use, as this drug can turn up in ecstasy pills but users won’t know what it is.”


Rest of the article here. https://www.news.com.au/technology/science/human-body/baseless-moral-panic-over-monkey-dust-drug-experts-say/news-story/21ecd434a5004cc72b9316b0431ffe5e

Personally I'd give this shit a very wide berth,

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K 



Joined: 09 Sep 2011


PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2019 4:54 am
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Does Marijuana Use Cause Schizophrenia?

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/17/health/cannabis-marijuana-schizophrenia.html

"... That is the big question, and so far the evidence is not strong enough to answer one way or the other. Even top scientists who specialize in marijuana research are divided, drawing opposite conclusions from the same data.

“I’ve been doing this research for 25 years, and it’s polarizing even among academics,” said Margaret Haney, a professor of neurobiology at Columbia University Medical Center. “This is what the marijuana field is like.”
...

Consider cigarettes, the least mind-altering of these substances. In a 2015 study, a team led by Dr. Kenneth S. Kendler of Virginia Commonwealth University analyzed medical data on nearly two million people in Sweden. The data followed the individuals over time, from young adulthood, when most schizophrenia diagnoses occur, to middle age. Smoking was a predictor for later development of the disorder, and in what doctors call a dose-response relationship: the more a person smoked, the higher the risk.

Yet nicotine attracts nowhere near the concern that cannabis does...
...

... [T]here is circumstantial evidence for a biological mechanism. Psychotic disorders tend to emerge in late adolescence or early adulthood, during or after a period of rapid brain development. In the teenage years, the brain strips away unneeded or redundant connections between brain cells, in a process called synaptic pruning. This editing is concentrated in the prefrontal cortex, the region behind the forehead where thinking and planning occur — and the region that is perturbed in psychotic conditions.

The region is rich with so-called CB1 receptors, which are involved in the pruning, and are engaged by cannabis use. And alterations to the pruning process may well increase schizophrenia risk, according to recent research...
...

“My study clearly shows that cannabis does not cause schizophrenia by itself,” said Dr. DeLisi. “Rather, a genetic predisposition is necessary. It is highly likely, based on the results of this study and others, that cannabis use during adolescence through to age 25, when the brain is maturing and at its peak of growth in a genetically vulnerable individual, can initiate the onset of schizophrenia.” ..."
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Pi 



Joined: 13 Feb 2006
Location: SA

PostPosted: Fri Feb 08, 2019 7:59 am
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lol , Two Roots beverage. only in america, here people would want thier money back if they didn't get two roots Laughing

https://www.canberratimes.com.au/business/markets/pot-of-gold-brewers-are-racing-to-make-weed-as-easy-to-drink-as-beer-20190207-p50w73.html

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stui magpie 

Oh the Premiership's a cakewalk


Joined: 03 May 2005
Location: preparing the Pilosocereus suppository

PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2019 1:04 pm
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Interesting little piece for anyone who thinks Humans are the only mammals who use substances to alter their consciousness.

Quote:
Humans aren't the only creatures that suffer from substance abuse problems. Horses eat hallucinogenic weeds, elephants get drunk on overripe fruit and big horn sheep love narcotic lichen. Monkeys' attraction to sugar-rich and ethanol-containing fruit, in fact, may explain our own attraction to alcohol, some researchers think.

Now, dolphins may join that list. Footage from a new BBC documentary series, "Spy in the Pod," reveals what appears to be dolphins getting high off of pufferfish. Pufferfish produce a potent defensive chemical, which they eject when threatened. In small enough doses, however, the toxin seems to induce "a trance-like state" in dolphins that come into contact with it, the Daily News reports:

The dolphins were filmed gently playing with the puffer, passing it between each other for 20 to 30 minutes at a time, unlike the fish they had caught as prey which were swiftly torn apart.
Zoologist and series producer Rob Pilley said that it was the first time dolphins had been filmed behaving this way.

At one point the dolphins are seen floating just underneath the water's surface, apparently mesmerised by their own reflections.

The dolphins' expert, deliberate handling of the terrorized puffer fish, Pilley told the Daily News, implies that this is not their first time at the hallucinogenic rodeo.


Read more: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/dolphins-seem-to-use-toxic-pufferfish-to-get-high-180948219/#DwMQpqP0djzOWj8v.99
Give the gift of Smithsonian magazine for only $12! http://bit.ly/1cGUiGv
Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter

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K 



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PostPosted: Thu Mar 07, 2019 5:20 am
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A nasal spray version of the drug ketamine has shown promise as an antidepressant, even if its properties still aren’t well understood.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/05/health/depression-treatment-ketamine-fda.html

"The newly approved treatment, called esketamine, is a nasal spray developed by Janssen Pharmaceuticals Inc., a branch of Johnson & Johnson, that will be marketed under the name Spravato. It contains an active portion of the ketamine molecule, whose antidepressant properties are not well understood yet.
...

The generic anesthetic is already increasingly available for depression... It often causes out-of-body and hallucinogenic sensations when administered...

The recommended course of the newly approved drug is twice a week, for four weeks, with boosters as needed, along with one of the commonly used oral antidepressants. F.D.A. approval requires that doses be taken in a doctor’s office or clinic, with patients monitored for at least two hours, and their experience entered in a registry; patients should not drive on the day of treatment.

Esketamine, like ketamine, has the potential for abuse, and both drugs can induce psychotic episodes in people who are at high risk for them.
...

Experts with long experience in treating depression were encouraged by the news, but also chary. The effectiveness of the previous class of antidepressants such as Prozac and Paxil was vastly exaggerated when they came on the market. And the results of esketamine trials, which were paid for and carried out by Janssen, were mixed.

In each trial submitted, all patients were started on a new antidepressant drug, and given a course of esketamine treatment or a placebo. In one monthlong study, those on esketamine performed better statistically than those on placebo, reducing scores on a standard, 60-point depression scale by 21 points, compared to 17 points for placebo. But in two others trials, the drug did not statistically outperform placebo treatment. Historically, the F.D.A. has required that a drug succeed in two short-term trials before it is approved; the agency loosened its criteria for esketamine, opting instead to study relapse in people who did well on the drug.
...

For now, no one knows whether esketamine, or any of the other ketamine-based compounds being studied, are any more effective than the generic anesthetic itself — or, for that matter, whether the out-of-body and hallucinatory “side effects” are in fact integral to its antidepressant properties."
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K 



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PostPosted: Thu Mar 07, 2019 5:08 pm
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ABC's article:

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-03-06/ketamine-esketamine-nasal-spray-treatment-for-depression/10875970

"On Tuesday, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Spravato for use as a treatment for patients who have failed to find relief from depression with at least two antidepressants.

The approval was granted on the basis of it being used in conjunction with an oral antidepressant.

University of Sydney's Brain and Mind Centre co-director Ian Hickie pointed out the drug had been used in emergency departments to provide fast-acting treatment to acutely depressed, suicidal patients.
...

UNSW psychiatrist Colleen Loo has been studying the use of ketamine as a treatment for depression for six years, and is currently in the midst of trialling the drug in a study with the Black Dog Institute.
...

Professor Loo said that like many medications, it is difficult to pinpoint exactly what ketamine does that makes it effective.

However, it's thought the drug helps to rejuvenate braincells which can be impacted by chronic depression.

"It has a strong effect in regrowing and plumping nerve cells," she said."
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K 



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PostPosted: Thu Mar 07, 2019 5:30 pm
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Here's an ajp.psychiatryonline.org article:

https://adaa.org/sites/default/files/Canuso-AJP-2018.pdf

It's by the drug-maker's people. Do you trust them?!
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